IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020)

Remembering Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Remarkable Legacy By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) “People ask me sometimes… ‘when will there be enough women on the Supreme Court?’ And my answer is: when there are nine.” Ruth Bader Ginsburg was born in Brooklyn, New York to Jewish immigrant parents. Her mother Celia was a bright student, but was forced to discontinue schooling at 15 because her family chose to … Continue reading IA Law Review: Acclaimed Biographies: Ruth Bader Ginsburg (1933-2020)

A Korean Perspective on the Truth about Dokdo

By Yeon Woo Lee (‘21) “Jessica, only child. Illinois, Chicago. Senior is Kim Jin Mo, who is your cousin.” This clip from the Korean movie Parasite became known as the Jessica Jingle. Although this resulted in an addiction nature to those watching the movie, the jingle has a wholly different meaning for Koreans. The melody of the jingle originates from “Dokdo is Our Land”, a … Continue reading A Korean Perspective on the Truth about Dokdo

IA Law Review – Justin Amash: Courageous Independence from Overt Partisanship

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) On July 4, 2019, Congressman Justin Amash announced his parting from the Republican Party, citing George Washington’s emotive warning against blinding partisanship amongst other reasons in his Independence Day editorial for The Washington Post (Amash). Just five months later, he was faced with a historic decision done only twice before: impeaching a sitting President of the United States. On that landmark … Continue reading IA Law Review – Justin Amash: Courageous Independence from Overt Partisanship

IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Nuremberg’s Legacies: A Consideration of Perspectives on the Extent of the Trials’ Significance)

By Vynateya Purimetla (’21) The Nuremberg Trials were a series of contentious international tribunals seeking justice for Nazi war crimes and crimes against humanity during World War II. These trials undoubtedly influenced subsequent human rights law. However, there is still debate surrounding their influence on post-war global order which is why this investigation seeks to explore their specific ramifications by asking the guiding research question:  … Continue reading IA Law Review: Legal Legacies (Nuremberg’s Legacies: A Consideration of Perspectives on the Extent of the Trials’ Significance)

Why We Shouldn’t Turn Away from Journalism

By YeonWoo Lee (’21) We live in a world where the idea of fake news has spread to every corner of the Earth. President Trump has recently argued with many journalists during the White House’s COVID-19 Task Force’s Updates. Fox News anchor Sean Hannity has recently threatened to sue the New York Times for libel. There are twitter debates on how truthful the media is … Continue reading Why We Shouldn’t Turn Away from Journalism

ARM-ed and Ready: How Apple is Preparing for the Future of Personal Computing

By Tasawwar Rahman (’22) Just 14 years ago, Apple transitioned its Mac chipsets from PowerPC to Intel, spurring onwards a decade and a half of unparalleled success. Now, once again, the Mac prepares for its biggest change yet as it gets ready to move on from Intel to newer more efficient ARM-based chips next year. In their highly-anticipated Worldwide Developer Conference next month, Apple is … Continue reading ARM-ed and Ready: How Apple is Preparing for the Future of Personal Computing